Wednesday, April 4

indiohistorian:

It was in 1835, in a time when the Spanish language was the in-thing in Philippine literature, a young Filipino began to dedicate his Tagalog composition to his ‘muse.’ The man was Francisco Baltazar y dela Cruz or simply known as Francisco Balagtas. Like a tale copied by Dumas, Balagtas fell in love with Maria Asuncion Rivera, but a certain wealthy man named Mariano Capule, who’s also interested with the lady, imprisoned Balagtas under false charges. It was in prison that Balagtas wrote one of the best of Philippine literature entitled Florante at Laura, perhaps alluding the darkness of his prison cell and his depression to the darkness of the forest and the tree where his protagonist, Florante, was tied.

Sa isang madlilim gubat na mapanglaw 
dawag na matinik ay walang pagitan,
halos naghihirap ang kay Pebong silang
dumalaw sa loob na lubhang masukal.


Malalaking kahoy ang inihahandog
pawang dalamhati, kahapisa’t lungkot,
huni pa ng ibon ay nakalulunos
sa lalong matipi’t nagsasayang loob. 

His muse would appear in Balagtas’ works under the name ‘Celia.’ Because of Florante at Laura, Balagtas unconsciously began a new genre of Philippine literature called Awit. It was years later in the early decade of the American period in the Philippines, the Filipino poet, Jose Corazon de Jesus, would name the Filipino art of extemporaneous poetic debate as Balagtasan. He died a year later when Rizal was born. 
Belated happy 224th birthday, Ginoong Francisco Balagtas! 

indiohistorian:

It was in 1835, in a time when the Spanish language was the in-thing in Philippine literature, a young Filipino began to dedicate his Tagalog composition to his ‘muse.’ The man was Francisco Baltazar y dela Cruz or simply known as Francisco Balagtas. Like a tale copied by Dumas, Balagtas fell in love with Maria Asuncion Rivera, but a certain wealthy man named Mariano Capule, who’s also interested with the lady, imprisoned Balagtas under false charges. It was in prison that Balagtas wrote one of the best of Philippine literature entitled Florante at Laura, perhaps alluding the darkness of his prison cell and his depression to the darkness of the forest and the tree where his protagonist, Florante, was tied.

Sa isang madlilim gubat na mapanglaw 

dawag na matinik ay walang pagitan,

halos naghihirap ang kay Pebong silang

dumalaw sa loob na lubhang masukal.

Malalaking kahoy ang inihahandog

pawang dalamhati, kahapisa’t lungkot,

huni pa ng ibon ay nakalulunos

sa lalong matipi’t nagsasayang loob. 

His muse would appear in Balagtas’ works under the name ‘Celia.’ Because of Florante at Laura, Balagtas unconsciously began a new genre of Philippine literature called Awit. It was years later in the early decade of the American period in the Philippines, the Filipino poet, Jose Corazon de Jesus, would name the Filipino art of extemporaneous poetic debate as Balagtasan. He died a year later when Rizal was born. 

Belated happy 224th birthday, Ginoong Francisco Balagtas! 

(via artivista)

myfamilytogether:

Joining our grassroots video protest, calling on President Obama to stop hold Green Card denials, is easy!1. Make a short webcam video and tell the President how immigration discrimination is hurting your family.2. Upload it to YouTube (or record it on the site)3. Tagit as MyFamilyTogether and we’ll find it.If you’re like thousands of us, immigration discrimination is hurting your family. The President needs to hear from you!

myfamilytogether:

Joining our grassroots video protest, calling on President Obama to stop hold Green Card denials, is easy!

1. Make a short webcam video and tell the President how immigration discrimination is hurting your family.
2. Upload it to YouTube (or record it on the site)
3. Tagit as MyFamilyTogether and we’ll find it.

If you’re like thousands of us, immigration discrimination is hurting your family. The President needs to hear from you!

(via gardant)

standupdiliman:

Teach me how to Noynoy. @NOYNOYINGhttp://facebook.com/Noynoying2012 

standupdiliman:

Teach me how to Noynoy. @NOYNOYING
http://facebook.com/Noynoying2012 

Tuesday, April 3

kulturalguerilla:

This Wednesday! Mabuhay mga caregivers!

kulturalguerilla:

Join us as we congratulate the caregivers and research assistants of the CARE Project!

Wednesday, April 4, 2012
6pm-8pm
Bayanihan Community Center
1010 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA

(Source: thatdarknight, via gardant)

standupdiliman:

#NOYNOYING

standupdiliman:

#NOYNOYING

Wednesday, February 22

We are hosting this youth conference! Open to all youth (ages 13-35). Register NOW.
anakbayansv:

FREE youth conference on March 10, at Stanford University! Workshops, performances, and discussions about our communities. Plus, a great chance to network and kick it with youth from all over the Bay! 
Register here by March 1st: http://www.sandiwa.org/?page_id=222
yensquared:

Check it out! Spread the word!! Registration deadline MARCH 1ST.
http://www.facebook.com/events/349266845091177/

We are hosting this youth conference! Open to all youth (ages 13-35). Register NOW.

anakbayansv:

FREE youth conference on March 10, at Stanford University! Workshops, performances, and discussions about our communities. Plus, a great chance to network and kick it with youth from all over the Bay! 

Register here by March 1st: http://www.sandiwa.org/?page_id=222

yensquared:

Check it out! Spread the word!! Registration deadline MARCH 1ST.

http://www.facebook.com/events/349266845091177/

Sunday, January 8

indiohistorian:

Before the day ends, I’d like to honor an old lady, who, old as she was, gave her everything to help the Katipuneros in their revolution against the tyranny of the Spanish authorities. She was born exactly 200 years ago, for she was born on January 6, 1812
She’s “Tandang Sora” (Old Sora). Her real name is Melchora Aquino. She was 84 years old when the Philippine Revolution against the Spanish sparked in 1896. Even though weak and feeble in old age, she offered her home to the Katipuneros wounded in battle, nursed their wounds and provided these heroes with a hideout to recuperate. That was amidst the watching eyes of the guardia civil. The time came when the Spaniards discovered her and interrogated her, but she remained steadfast and refused to tell where the Katipunan was or what their plans were. She was exiled to Guam, a heavy price she had to pay that not even Apolinario Mabini could not take. Tandang Sora returned to the Philippines after the Americans took over. 
Cheers to you Tandang Sora. You taught us that old age is not an excuse to compromise your principles and to not love your country.

indiohistorian:

Before the day ends, I’d like to honor an old lady, who, old as she was, gave her everything to help the Katipuneros in their revolution against the tyranny of the Spanish authorities. She was born exactly 200 years ago, for she was born on January 6, 1812

She’s “Tandang Sora” (Old Sora). Her real name is Melchora Aquino. She was 84 years old when the Philippine Revolution against the Spanish sparked in 1896. Even though weak and feeble in old age, she offered her home to the Katipuneros wounded in battle, nursed their wounds and provided these heroes with a hideout to recuperate. That was amidst the watching eyes of the guardia civil. The time came when the Spaniards discovered her and interrogated her, but she remained steadfast and refused to tell where the Katipunan was or what their plans were. She was exiled to Guam, a heavy price she had to pay that not even Apolinario Mabini could not take. Tandang Sora returned to the Philippines after the Americans took over. 

Cheers to you Tandang Sora. You taught us that old age is not an excuse to compromise your principles and to not love your country.

(via gardant)

Thursday, January 5

anakbayanla:

YOUTH AND STUDENT MOVEMENT IN THE PHILIPPINES

This video was filmed during an exposure trip of July 2011 in the Philippines and featured at the Anakbayan Seattle report back multi-media show “Halong” in November 2011. 

An exposure trip is a program designed to expose people to the harsh realities and true living conditions experienced by the people of the Philippines through educational discussions, integrations, mass actions and community organizing.

Anakbayan members from the Los Angeles, Seattle, New York, and New Jersey chapters had the opportunity to learn about the youth and student conditions in the Philippines and the movement of young people demanding basic human rights for their future.

We were able to integrate with various youth and student organizations including Anakbayan chapters at the University of the Philippines Diliman and the Polytechnic University of the Philippines, as well as other youth groups, alliances and fraternities, including out-of-school youth, working youth, and youth organizing in the women’s movement, workers movement, cultural movement, and other sectors of Philippine society.

Filmed by: Nicole Ramirez
Edited by: Janelle Quibuyen
Music: From Monument To Masses - Comrades and Friends

To learn more about the National Democratic Movement in the Philippines and get involved in Anakbayan Los Angeles, visit anakbayanla.org or email anakbayanla@gmail.com

Welcome to Isulong: The Official Blog of Kababayan, Stanford PASU's Issues Committee!